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CHS juniors see increases in ACT scores

Campbellsville High School students are continuing to improve their ACT scores.

 

According to their results, this past year’s juniors scored higher than the state average in all categories but one.

 

Scores for exams taken in March were recently released, and show that CHS students have improved in math, reading and science.

 

And, the average CHS score is the same as the stage average.

 

While CHS students saw impressive scores in English, that average is a bit less than what the juniors scored in the 2016-2016 school year.

 

All high school juniors are required to take the ACT. The test was administered in March, and 66 juniors at CHS took the exam.

 

Overall, the CHS junior class tested at a composite score of 19.8, which is higher than the 19.4 students scored in the 2015-2016 school year.

 

This year’s state average score is also 19.8.

 

In English, CHS students scored an average of 17.9, which is slightly lower than the 18.5 average from the 2015-2016 school year.

 

Math scores improved by nearly a point, at 20.1, when compared to 19.2 from the previous year. The CHS math average is higher than the state average of 19.4.

 

Reading scores for the CHS junior class jumped to 20.3 from 20.2 the previous year. The school’s reading score is the same as the state average.

 

And science scores improved from 19.5 to a 20.4 average, which is higher than the state average of 19.9.

 

Overall, the CHS composite score increased from 19.4 to 19.8, which is the same as the state average.

 

CHS ACT Scores 2016-2017

 

In addition to seeing increases in their average scores, more of last year’s CHS juniors met college readiness benchmarks than in 2015-2016.

 

Overall, 18 percent of the CHS juniors met all four benchmarks, up from 13 percent.

 

In English, 50 percent of the CHS juniors tested met the benchmark. This score is the same as in the 2015-2016 year, and up considerably from 38 percent in the 2014-2015 school year.

 

In math, 38 percent of CHS juniors met the benchmark, up considerably from 26 percent.

 

CHS juniors also saw a gain in reading. In that category, 42 percent met the benchmark, up from 39 percent in the 2015-2016 school year. The CHS reading score is higher than the state average of students meeting the benchmark, which is 41 percent.

 

And in science, 36 percent of CHS students met the benchmark in 2016-2017, which is up considerably from the 26 percent in 2015-2016. That number is also higher than the state average of 32 percent.

 

CHS ACT Benchmark Scores 2016-2017

 

According to CHS Guidance Counselor Richard Dooley, the average improvement in CHS students’ previous ACT score was 1.4 points.

 

About 20 students improved their scores by three or more points, he said. Of those, 11 improved by four points or more and five improved by five points or more.

 

Campbellsville Independent Schools Superintendent Kirby Smith, who was CHS principal when the students took the ACT exam, said he is proud of his students for improving their scores.

 

“I am very proud to see our ACT scores increase yet again,” he said.

 

“I hope all of our students see these scores and are proud of their accomplishments. I also want students to see these scores as a challenge to keep improving.”

 

Campbellsville High School is classified as a “School of Distinction,” according to state test scores from the 2015-2016 school year.

 

And Campbellsville Independent Schools is a “distinguished” district.

 

“Seeing an improvement in ACT scores is just another indicator that CHS is continuing to move in the right direction,” Smith said. “We couldn’t be prouder to be a ‘School of Distinction,’ and our teachers and students are working hard to maintain that status.”

 

Smith said he thanks students for working hard to improve their ACT scores, and teachers for being dedicated to help students fulfill their potential.

 

Many teachers worked with students at ACT practice sessions after school, he said, and that truly made a difference in the scores.

 

As students improve their ACT scores at CHS, they become members of the school’s ACT clubs. Those names are listed in the CHS hallways.

 

“They should be proud to see their names in our ACT Clubs,” he said. “That’s quite an honor.”

 

Smith said improving by one or two points on the ACT can mean a great difference when it comes to scholarships.

 

“CHS has had a lot of success.” Smith said. “And we all want to see that continue. These ACT scores tell us that what we are doing is working. We will continue to work hard and improve even more.”

 

Smith said he also wants to thank the Campbellsville Board of Education for paying for all CHS juniors to take the ACT test each October.

 

“I thank the Board for its continued support in helping our students take the ACT exam in October,” he said. “This allows us to receive scores back early, and then use those scores to drive ACT study sessions on early release Fridays and during second period RTI sessions.”

 

State funding pays for students to take the exam in March, Smith said, so students at CHS take the test twice in their junior year, at no cost.

 

“Not every district can do that,” he said. “And I’m very grateful to our Board members for that.

 

“I also want to thank our teachers for their willingness to go the extra mile,” Smith said. “Our teachers use ACT test scores to provide individualized instruction. This helps our students work on the areas in which they need help. And that is what helps students increase their scores.”





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